Heaven is Our Bucket List

Lately, I’ve been thinking a lot about heaven.  Not because I’ve experienced any recent loss, but just from thinking about writing. It’s been over a month since my last post (a combination of the holidays and lack of motivation), and it made me wish I had more time to write. This catapulted into thoughts like, “Will I ever write more than this?” Will I write a book someday?” “Or just get published somewhere a little more noteworthy?”

Before I descended into despair, a new thought sprouted up and choked out the others.  The thought of heaven.  My thoughts were grounded too much on this Earth.  I was believing this life was my only chance at…well, life. My death isn’t the end for me or for my writing. I’ll have all of eternity to focus in on my craft. Maybe I’ll even be better at it in some ways? I’m sure being without sin has its perks.

Heaven and Motherhood

Thinking about heaven has not only affected the way I think about writing, but the way I think about motherhood. There is so much of eternity wrapped up in rearing children. One of the most frustrating things about being a parent is working hard and not always getting immediate results or rounds of applause. We might see some fruit from our parenting labors in this lifetime, but many we won’t know or see until heaven.

2 Corinthians 4:16-18 says, “So we do not lose heart. Though our outer nature is wasting away, our inner nature is being renewed day by day. For this slight momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, as we look not to the things that are seen, but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal.”

Every sacrifice for our children, every teaching moment, every loving word and action, every time we grow in character through parenting is an eternal thing. We’re building an unseen eternal kingdom in our homes. It’s much more glorious than snotty noses and poopy diapers. We might not hear shouts of approval and rounds of applause now for every mundane task we do, but in heaven we will hear, “Well done, good and faithful servant.

Dream About Heaven

It’s important to dream about heaven. To dream about what we will do and accomplish there. Every dream and aspiration can be met in heaven if we can’t do it on Earth. Who needs a bucket list with this kind of guarantee?

Heaven is hope for the weary mom. It’s the ultimate comfort, because every trial and disappointment we face points to something better. It should make us groan and long for heaven.

2 Corinthians 5:1-2 says, “For we know that if the tent, which is our earthly home, is destroyed, we have a building from God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. For in this tent we groan, longing to put on our heavenly dwelling.”

Every negative thing we feel or know on this Earth turns into a positive in heaven.  Every hardship is a blessing if it makes us long for heaven. Are you discouraged by your lack of progress in the Christian faith? Groan and long for heaven. Where you will be fully perfected in the way God already sees you through Christ. Do you feel distant from God? Does he seem silent? Groan and long for heaven where you will never feel this way again. You will finally see his face and feel his presence forever.

Heaven is for the sinner saved by grace, it’s for the mom who is Queen of the mundane, and it’s for the artist who needs more time and opportunity than this life can offer.

Home is Your Canvas: An Edith Schaeffer Book Review

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Maybe you’ve heard of the tortured artist. A frustrated and alienated character (also, real-life person) who feels like no one gets him or his art.  Edith Schaeffer, in her book, The Hidden Art of Homemaking addresses this type of person. The book is aimed towards women in the home, but at times also men.

Before you run and hide for cover at the word homemaking, know that Schaeffer is not trying to add another ball for you to juggle in life, but opening our eyes to the importance of beauty and order. Schaeffer shows us that homemaking is not drudgery, but a blank canvas for us to express ourselves. Art doesn’t just have to be framed paintings hanging on our walls; it can be a colorfully arranged plate of food for dinner, fresh and thoughtfully arrayed flowers on a table, or a well designed book case display.

The Little Things Matter

Why should these little things matter to us around our homes? Schaeffer says it plain and simple: because we are Christians. She presents the case that we are creative, because we are made in the image of the Creator God. God is the originator of all art forms. So, Christians should be the prime advocates of art, creativity, and beauty.

“The Christian should have more vividly expressed creativity in his daily life, and have more creative freedom, as well as the possibility of a continuing development in creative activities.”

“But, not forgetting the above, then what I call ‘Hidden Art’ should be more important to one who knows and admits that he is made in God’s image, than to those who do not.”

Everyday Details

Schaeffer refers to hidden art, not in the way of a career or profession, but as the everyday details of one’s life. We should use our hidden art in our homes everyday as a way to enrich other people’s lives, and represent the beauty found in Christ. Each chapter in Schaeffer’s book explores different art forms and how we can express them in our homes; it’s a way to give ourselves (the tortured artist) an outlet, but also a way to enrich our families and guests.

“A Christian, above all people, should live artistically, aesthetically, and creatively. We are supposed to be representing the Creator who is there, and whom we acknowledge to be there.”

“If we have been created in the image of an Artist, then we should look for expressions of artistry, and be sensitive to beauty, responsive to what has been created for our appreciation.”

You don’t have to be a married woman to read this book, heck, you don’t even have to be a woman. You just need to be someone who has some kind of living space in which to exercise your art. Whatever you call home…that is your canvas!